Fred Fernackerpan
Fred Fernackerpan
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Victorian Farm Episode VI
Views 191K4 years ago
Victorian Farm Episode V
Views 210K4 years ago
Victorian Farm Episode IV
Views 239K4 years ago
Victorian Farm Episode III
Views 257K4 years ago
Victorian Farm Episode II
Views 299K4 years ago
Victorian Farm Episode I
Views 544K4 years ago

Comments

  • Tim Farris
    Tim Farris Day ago

    I watch these shows evry day even in the summer I Love them all and especially clumper

  • Engin Engin
    Engin Engin 3 days ago

    İgrenc bi millet bu ingilizler, kadinda cok çirkin

  • Belle Sparks
    Belle Sparks 4 days ago

    I adore Ruth, her enthusiasm, real laughter, her sweet daughter, Alex, his bees, inquisitiveness, Peter, hardworking, can do anything and all of their kind hearts:)! God bless all their hands after days, weeks and months of digging, scrubbing, creating dyes, paints, recycling leftover coal soot to the garden, homemade wall plasters, brick making, tile making from clay, and even homemade pan scrub from old red brick. Thank heavens for Ruth's lard and oatmeal hand cream:)! I so enjoy learning all these ways. Many are so useful today and inspiring! Thank you all:)!

  • Belle Sparks
    Belle Sparks 4 days ago

    I learned on a treadle from my Grandmother, lol!!! Luca is awesome:)!! I would love to see him included in all the episodes:)! Him and Ruth have a very fun chemistry together:)!!! And Luca is so right!!! More good times.

  • TreeTrout
    TreeTrout 4 days ago

    This is what bothers me about alex. I think most would agree he has an aggressive ego... But while Peter is figuring out, quite effectively, how the " Binder " works alex misses a thread- hole and says, " this is the most important operation left ", or something.. It shows you, or at least me. Perhaps it wouldn't bother me if Peter wasn't so darned likeable....... But Alex IS self-centered.

  • TreeTrout
    TreeTrout 4 days ago

    HOLD IT !! Newfoundland, Canada, especially the solid English Shore - i.e. Th e bottom West Coast of the Island - Have English descendants, like my family who grew up eating Chutney, Piccadilly and Christmas Pudding!!! Of Course!!! The Pudding was brought in after the meal, Given a good dollop of Brandy and lit aflame to the Children's delight. By the time they ate it all alcohol was burned off. What fun the season used to be.

  • TreeTrout
    TreeTrout 4 days ago

    Peter is always a riot. At approx. 22:00 he comes out for the day with a belt on, which IS too big, and, at the same time has ONE suspender dragging off his hip( the other one may be on his shoulder). The perfect Archaeologist !!

  • TreeTrout
    TreeTrout 4 days ago

    The consistency of porridge - I've heard that enough, thank you. lol

  • TreeTrout
    TreeTrout 4 days ago

    I've done, pretty much all that these fine people do - i'd say 80 - 90 % - Hardest are the ploughing ( all field work ) Picking spuds ( and they had a machine!!! ) Harvests of all sorts, And work in a farm house which, being My Grandfather's was basically a Victorian 'Home " - outhouse, pump etc. The pump was a real improvement...loved by all believe me. Some really fond memories - breaking out the chutney &pasta. Jiggs dinners, pig roasts. I live in England's oldest colony - Newfoundland, Canada. A lot of my Childhood, I recall fondly is reflected in the way images on this show and the Edwardian, because they resemble the way I was brought up and some of my Fondest Memories.

  • Arm Yourself
    Arm Yourself 5 days ago

    Pete's coat is nice, what is it called?

  • Lala White
    Lala White 7 days ago

    Real people very amazed

  • Stephen Macuch
    Stephen Macuch 12 days ago

    First ran across these fine folk in their 'Secrets of the Castle' documentary. I found the farm series strangely captivating, and will be watching all of them. Well conceived and well produced...thoroughly entertaining. Thanks for posting, and of course thanks go to the BBC for another fine example of their excellent programming. Beats watching webshows and pop culture videos hands down, as well as what's on mainstream television.

  • gazepreyed
    gazepreyed 17 days ago

    "Why are we whispering?" I couldn't stop laughing 🤣

  • Hannah O
    Hannah O 17 days ago

    "Making sure the men are all fed and watered" lmao like they're additional livestock the wife has to feed

  • nacht98
    nacht98 17 days ago

    the two guys are actually really hot!!

  • Ali Boop bop boop
    Ali Boop bop boop 17 days ago

    “Growing dairy”....hehehe...I love Ruth

  • blacktulip
    blacktulip 18 days ago

    I wish they make another period of pharmacy series. They made a Victorian pharmacy and I love that series so much.

  • Aarin S
    Aarin S 19 days ago

    Animal abuse

  • Heather Marie
    Heather Marie 20 days ago

    I'm watching from Toledo, Ohio, USA and I LOVE these types shows! Thank you for uploading 😁

  • Christopher Jason Luper

    Pull out scythes and stack hay after it dries

  • Belle Sparks
    Belle Sparks 22 days ago

    I am enjoying this sooo much! I found this after watching Wartime Kitchen and Gardens, also wonderful:)!

  • ruthieo54
    ruthieo54 22 days ago

    An Irish friend of mine would use the term "donkey work" and I never got it till now. Peace.

  • minnesota/lakes
    minnesota/lakes 25 days ago

    Beautiful!! Merry Christmas, 2019 ✨

  • sprinx elminster
    sprinx elminster 25 days ago

    22:30 worst ax using I've ever seen.

  • Lisa Currier
    Lisa Currier 25 days ago

    WHY IS "VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS" FILMED IN THE SUMMER...? RIDICULOUS....

  • thomas Glasscock
    thomas Glasscock 26 days ago

    Thanks for posting! Really enjoying the series. What those boys needed to catch that ram was a lasso.

  • Don White
    Don White 28 days ago

    I've always loved the wassailing songs! Great to learn the history of it, as well as the meaning of the word!

  • Perry Comeau
    Perry Comeau 28 days ago

    2020

  • Perry Comeau
    Perry Comeau 28 days ago

    Clumper reminds me of Tony.

  • Perry Comeau
    Perry Comeau 28 days ago

    I was a boy friend of a Coventry, and had the enjoyable privilege to help them on the farm.

  • Vintage Beauty
    Vintage Beauty 28 days ago

    I love anything with these three!!

  • eciuj xob
    eciuj xob 29 days ago

    38:25.."without this kit it's just a fire".. nope..it's a party barn mate!!

  • Shelly Rae
    Shelly Rae 29 days ago

    Thankful this popped into my recommendations on this cold and foggy Christmas eve!

    • Satin Perfume
      Satin Perfume 28 days ago

      Happy Christmas and New Year. May next year be filled with much happiness ❤️

  • Perry Comeau
    Perry Comeau Month ago

    A classic joy of family entertainment.

  • Sarker Junior
    Sarker Junior Month ago

    Very informative... Ruth's laughter is quite relaxing .... Thanks

  • laura55987
    laura55987 Month ago

    We should all step back to a quieter time...

  • Mia._.
    Mia._. Month ago

    who is here only for school?

  • serendipidus1
    serendipidus1 Month ago

    Every canal was clog danced into place... By cows... That's what I learned.

  • serendipidus1
    serendipidus1 Month ago

    Black pudding floor!! Love it!!

  • ZainaDancer
    ZainaDancer Month ago

    This was the most wonderful production I've seen in quite a long time! I loved it and I will watch it many many more times. I love the toast at the end, and it reminded me of my favorite Irish blessing / toast which goes like this: "May those who love us, love us, and those who don't, may God turn their hearts, and if He doesn't turn their hearts, may He turn their ankles so we'll know them by their limping." Thanks to those who made these shows and to those who uploaded them for our enjoyment. Happy Christmas!

  • Lillian Bowen
    Lillian Bowen Month ago

    I love Ruth, Alex and Peter but Tom Willianson makes my heart thump as hard as he swings and slams his hammer.

  • tina thompson
    tina thompson Month ago

    3:00 Wait..."a washroom copper" was used to "boil pudding"? In other words, Victorians cooked food in the same pot used to wash clothes??? Sounds like yuck!

  • ZainaDancer
    ZainaDancer Month ago

    I love the way Peter talked to the ram, introducing him to his new home! Adorbs (the ram AND Peter). 💜

  • Joanne Davis
    Joanne Davis Month ago

    Imagine the scale of workers and craftsman that were needed to build the enormous castles in Tudor times to build the massive castles!

    • serendipidus1
      serendipidus1 Month ago

      There's a series with these same guys building a Norman castle in France and it is indeed mind boggling.

  • tina thompson
    tina thompson Month ago

    For as hard as Victorian farmers worked, it's puzzling they included so much labor in Christmas preparations, too.

  • tina thompson
    tina thompson Month ago

    What are "snaps" and where do you get them? Or, is there a substitute for a snap?

  • Sandra Noneofyourbusiness

    51:38 "Mine's wrapped in wee-wee ribbon." "Yes, you appear to have drawn the short straw there buddy." -This is the best exchange ever!

  • J. Adams
    J. Adams Month ago

    I am loving the segment on the mill. There are some functioning 19th century mills in my area, and I love buying my cornmeal from the Graue Mill over in Oakbrook IL. Nothing beats cornbread made from their meal.

    • wagfelt
      wagfelt Month ago

      Spent many fun days wandering around the forest preserves near the Graue mill as a child (1950's), just last year visited the mill and got their cornmeal , brought it back to our home in Iowa and made the best cornbread.

  • Sandra Noneofyourbusiness

    I think the paper blanket would be softer/more comfortable if you were to crumple the paper first and then smooth it out?

  • Tresa Joseph
    Tresa Joseph Month ago

    Thank you for sharing. What a learning experience.

  • Lynx South
    Lynx South Month ago

    20:10 The plowing expert says, "My father used to say, 'Hard work never killed anyone: it made them into [...]'". What is the end of what his father says, please?

  • Nunnuv Yorbizniz
    Nunnuv Yorbizniz Month ago

    Man I love this show so much. I think we ALL need to get back to this kind of life, to some extent. Everything is too easy and it's not good for us.

  • Kristen McKenrick

    What are we supposed to do with all the leisure time that modern technology has given us? Is how we spend that time actually productive and satisfying? Or are we just "killing time" compared to our ancestors?

  • milkshake123
    milkshake123 Month ago

    Such a great series. So enjoyable & informative. Wonder how they discovered stale urine set the color when dying cloth. Really amazing & ingenious.

  • Gilbert Medina
    Gilbert Medina Month ago

    I am making the comparison between these episodes and “the supersizers go Victorian” ( which I enjoy)

  • Nunnuv Yorbizniz
    Nunnuv Yorbizniz Month ago

    I'm so glad I found this again! I watched several episodes years ago and loved it. Very satisfying and wholesome

  • J Stewart
    J Stewart Month ago

    Wish that older lady would have cleaned her fingernails first before making buttermilk. THATS NASTY.

  • Doreen Andrus
    Doreen Andrus Month ago

    I love the common thread all farmers have and especially the Victorian, the Appalachian, Amish. Prairie homesteader and the like. thriving and making life work using what it offers and we all can learn alot from observing these hearty folks

  • heather williamson

    Question: What book did she take those patterns from?

  • Jeff Ircink
    Jeff Ircink Month ago

    fred - any idea why 3 of the Edwardian Farm eps. were blocked in the U.S.?

  • Michael O'Reilly
    Michael O'Reilly Month ago

    Alex Langlands is one of the sexiest men alive😜

  • Vanja Trach
    Vanja Trach Month ago

    Koliko moras biti jadan da ovo dislajkas😖😖 Izvrsna serija👏👏👏💓 Pozdrav iz Hrvatske!

  • Vanja Trach
    Vanja Trach Month ago

    Odlicna serija. Pozdrav iz Hrvatske!

  • Vanja Trach
    Vanja Trach Month ago

    Obozavam ovu emisiju...steta sto nema prevoda.

  • drgrl
    drgrl Month ago

    the narrator sounds a bit like Rob Brydon.

  • Jeff Ircink
    Jeff Ircink Month ago

    i've only watched Victorian Farm Christmas and just started this particular series, but i haven't seen them address the toilet issue. what did they do?

    • Lynx South
      Lynx South Month ago

      @Jeff Ircink Sorry, not a clue. I haven't watched Edwardian Farm yet. I use a free VPN for those situations.

    • Jeff Ircink
      Jeff Ircink Month ago

      @Lynx South thanks. lynn. i'm watching that series now. any idea why Eps, 9, 10 and 12 of Edwardian Farm are not available for viewing in the U.S.?

    • Lynx South
      Lynx South Month ago

      In the series Tales From the Green Valley about a 17th-C. farm, they built an outhouse, and not an elaborate one, either.

  • Jeff Ircink
    Jeff Ircink Month ago

    anyone know if Thomas Stackhouse Acton is still with us? he's be 94 in 2019. great series...and yes, to answer someone's comments, it does make me feel lazier.

  • Billy Campbell
    Billy Campbell Month ago

    Here in Northeast Tennessee, America, durring Victorian times through the 1940s, lamp globes were cleaned every morning, not weekly as on this program.

  • Billy Campbell
    Billy Campbell Month ago

    I would hate to farm in Great Britain now. There would be no problem in cutting a log in America then or now, it's about freedom, it's why our ancestors came here.

  • Billy Campbell
    Billy Campbell Month ago

    While the farm wife would be forever striving to improve her bread baking skills, she had little or no concern for its "nutrient" value, that is a worry of people who only work eight hours a day, opposed to working sun up to sun down.

  • Billy Campbell
    Billy Campbell Month ago

    If the hay is green when it gets rain on it won't hurt the hay. But if the hay is nearly cured when it gets rained on you are in bad luck. Also very, very few farms would have a tetter to use in the hay field.

  • Billy Campbell
    Billy Campbell Month ago

    I'm enjoying watching the program and am comparing their methods of 19th century farming to farming here in Northeast Tennessee, USA durring the same period. So far in observing the cutting of hay I think the 19th farmer would have left the hay where it lay until it was dry, then it would be put into Wind rows.

  • Jenn S
    Jenn S Month ago

    Really interesting! I would have loved to participate! I do hope you do this again with another period.

  • Johnny Casteel
    Johnny Casteel Month ago

    no...what kicked started the industrial revolution was the child labor in the mines EXTRACTING the coal.

  • Richard Sanchez
    Richard Sanchez Month ago

    22:36 holy shit.

  • Kathy Wilkins
    Kathy Wilkins Month ago

    While making butter and talking about how clean dairy maids were, the older woman, Ruth, was displaying hands with filthy fingernails, like she just came in from digging in the garden. What a turnoff, and a shudder to see her next up to wrists in bread dough! Ugh!

  • Lea Redding
    Lea Redding Month ago

    so... the kiln and the clamp are made of bricks, and these are used to fire bricks... so what did they use to make the bricks to build the kiln and clamp? chicken and egg sort of situation...

  • galanie
    galanie Month ago

    My daddy was the son of an Appalachian farmer. He was born in 1913 and he got an orange for Christmas sometimes when he was really little also. So some in America still kept the tradition even up into the time of George V.

    • Karen Siegel
      Karen Siegel Month ago

      My brother married a girl from a family who lived 3 miles from us that received an orange and a dime in their stocking up to 1970. The kids grew up, got jobs and started buying or making "Christmas" for the family. They still had an outhouse. They were hard workers and wonderful cooks.

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    Called a bullrake

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    That's why they had what was called a sheep dip to put the sheep in to kill parasites like maggots

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    Being Ruth is cold nature he should gather the the scraps and some of the wool and make a quilt. Very warm

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    We dont call them seed fiddles here in America, they are called Cyclone seeders still in use

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    I remember as a youngster my dad bought 3 bred sows in late November or early December and they were due in early march supposedly but in late Feb we'd had some warm days but we had a severe cold front come through in late February and about 6PM it set the pigs in labor, my mom grabbed all her dish towels and we went to the barn all the sows were in labor and we started delivering piglets we delivered the pigs by laying down a dish towel and when they came out we gathered them up dried them off and put them on a tear. My dad was there as well as my oldest brother and his first wife we delivered pigs till almost midnight. We delivered 27 pigs from the 3 sows I dint remember any fatalities

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    It's amazing that Polio was considered a clean disease it affected a higher percentage of middle class children than it did poorer classes of children

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    Impressed that they chose Tamworth breed of hogs they are the original Irish Grazers, really a pasture pig does very well in pastures or timberland Excellent

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    MY dad who used to go up to Iowa to stay with his Grandma Davis and his Uncle and Aunt as a child did not like Mutton, but I think part of that from his time in WW2 the US Army served alot of Mutton in the mess.

  • Robert Payne
    Robert Payne 2 months ago

    In Mount Plesant Iowa they changed from Coal to wood for power generation at the OLD THRESHERS REUNION TO RUN THE STEAM ENGINES DUE THAT COAL IS A DIRTY FUEL.

  • Elizabeth Long
    Elizabeth Long 2 months ago

    "˚°◦.¸¸◦仌..thank you°"˚°◦.¸¸◦仌°

  • martine. mjt
    martine. mjt 2 months ago

    sherlock holmes and the doctor watson make bricks!

  • Fox Kitten
    Fox Kitten 2 months ago

    One saved one's best for church and special occasions, and aprons, overskirts and oversleeves protected the outside of dresses, and linen underclothing soaked up body odour to protect the clothing from the inside. Additionally, everyday skirts were ankle length, just high enough to avoid the worst of the dirt. The ladies of the manor wore their skirts just barely touching the floor.

  • tauntonlake
    tauntonlake 2 months ago

    That place must smell amazing outside. The woodsmoke and all. LIke Old Sturbridge Village in Massachusetts.

  • tauntonlake
    tauntonlake 2 months ago

    03:02 " That is a tasty bit of wood "

  • Angelwing Lowlang
    Angelwing Lowlang 2 months ago

    I love the relationship between Alex and Clumper. Such good boys.

  • Cinema Inclined
    Cinema Inclined 2 months ago

    Wonderful program! I have thoroughly enjoyed every moment. Thank you very much for sharing.

  • Thats Me
    Thats Me 2 months ago

    Amazing.

  • babablacksheepdog
    babablacksheepdog 2 months ago

    I must say, sealing the kiln looks like a lot of fun.

  • Angelwing Lowlang
    Angelwing Lowlang 2 months ago

    Gotta say, hearing that shires are endangered made me so sad. They're truly stunning horses, and absolute gentle giants. I hope there will be a change

  • Eunice Stone
    Eunice Stone 2 months ago

    The cow was skeered. Lol

  • AK Thunder
    AK Thunder 2 months ago

    I'm German and I love Christmas trees.

  • A K
    A K 2 months ago

    Florence going from this side to that side. Shy 😌😌😘