The 5 most difficult things about learning Russian | how to learn Russian

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  • Published on May 24, 2018
  • In the 1st episode of Learn about Russian Bridget talks about cases, verbs of motion, prefixes, imperfective and perfective verbs, and pronunciation.
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    Link to Bridget's TVclip channel - tvclip.biz/channel/UCqILnGzWyjqnPFqS2e1yVWQ
    0:23 - Russian has 6 cases!
    0:28 - In English, the word order is stable: I saw him. He saw me.
    0:45 - List of cases
    Nominative (Именительный),
    Genitive (Родительный),
    Dative (Дательный),
    Accusative (Винительный),
    Instrumental (Творительный),
    Prepositional (Предложный)
    0:51 - In Russian, word order can change because of cases, and the meaning remains unchanged!
    1:17 - 2. Imperfective vs Perfective verbs
    1:21 - Is the action complete or not?
    1:30 - Verbs come in pairs, like:
    1:35 - отвечать (что делать?) and ответить (что сделать?) = to answer
    1:40 - читать (что делать?) and прочитать (что сделать?) = to read
    1:46 - Yesterday I read a book. "Вчера я читал книгу" or "Вчера я прочитал/дочитал книгу"
    2:10 - 3. Verbs of motion
    2:29 - You always need to specify
    2:52 - 4. Prefixes
    3:01 - They are added to words to specify their meaning.
    3:11 - Towards (под-ходить), away from (от-ходить, у-ходить), through (про-ходить), into (в-ходить), out of (вы-ходить), etc.
    3:21 - 5. Pronunciation
    3:26 - You can pronounce a Russian word as it's spelled, as long as you know the stress
    3:40 - Tricky sounds
    3:42 - Ы: мы (we), вы (you plural), ты (you singular)
    3:52 - Ь (мягкий знак) is not pronounced, but modifies other sounds.
    3:57 - Брат (brother) is not the same as брать (to take)
    4:18 - Learning Russian will make your brain smarter!

Comments • 94

  • RUSSIA BEYOND
    RUSSIA BEYOND  Year ago +14

    0:23 - Russian has 6 cases!
    0:28 - In English, the word order is stable: I saw him. He saw me.
    0:45 - List of cases
    Nominative (Именительный),
    Genitive (Родительный),
    Dative (Дательный),
    Accusative (Винительный),
    Instrumental (Творительный),
    Prepositional (Предложный)
    0:51 - In Russian, word order can change because of cases, and the meaning remains unchanged!
    1:17 - 2. Imperfective vs Perfective verbs
    1:21 - Is the action complete or not?
    1:30 - Verbs come in pairs, like:
    1:35 - отвечать (что делать?) and ответить (что сделать?) = to answer
    1:40 - читать (что делать?) and прочитать (что сделать?) = to read
    1:46 - Yesterday I read a book. "Вчера я читал книгу" or "Вчера я прочитал/дочитал книгу"
    2:10 - 3. Verbs of motion
    2:29 - You always need to specify
    2:52 - 4. Prefixes
    3:01 - They are added to words to specify their meaning.
    3:11 - Towards (под-ходить), away from (от-ходить, у-ходить), through (про-ходить), into (в-ходить), out of (вы-ходить), etc.
    3:21 - 5. Pronunciation
    3:26 - You can pronounce a Russian word as it's spelt, as long as you know the stress
    3:40 - Tricky sounds
    3:42 - Ы: мы (we), вы (you plural), ты (you singular)
    3:52 - Ь (мягкий знак) is not pronounced, but modifies other sounds.
    3:57 - Брат (brother) is not the same as брать (to take)
    4:18 - Learning Russian will make your brain smarter!

  • Vladimir Bakhirev
    Vladimir Bakhirev 3 days ago

    You've fogotten the most difficult thing in Russian - genders of nouns

  • lol lol
    lol lol Month ago

    when russian empire was born...
    guy 1: okay its time to make our own language!
    guy 2: youre right! that stupid english make my tongue sick!
    guy 1: *makes the language*
    1 hour later
    guy 2: make it harder!
    guy 1: *makes the language harder*
    1 hour later
    guy 2: make it harder!
    guy: *repeat the same thing*
    and so on...

    • RUSSIA BEYOND
      RUSSIA BEYOND  Month ago

      Overall, Russian language had emerged from mixing of the Church Slavonic language and Old East Slavic.

  • просто Ира

    Привет🙂

  • Fanon
    Fanon 2 months ago

    Yikes! I think I'll try my hand at learning an easier language.

  • amjan
    amjan 3 months ago +1

    I'm Polish and everything that makes Russian hard to learn for you makes it easy to learn for me ;)

  • Wha ck
    Wha ck 3 months ago +1

    As a spanish speaker it was very easy to pick up the sound for "нь" because it's identical to the spanish letter "ñ"

  • Aaron Horscxyz
    Aaron Horscxyz 3 months ago +3

    I really appreciate this video, I'm 2 years in, still at a basic level but this has given me hope!!
    I head to Russia in September for 7 weeks to improve my language skills and this has boosted my morale :)

  • Blade 7818
    Blade 7818 3 months ago

    Ы is like getting punched in the stomach. That's how I say it. 😆

  • Fatter Fatterovich
    Fatter Fatterovich 4 months ago

    There are different ways of learning foreign languages, the best way to learn Russian is to speak to the native speakers as more as you can.

  • waffles
    waffles 4 months ago

    Ya rooskiy

  • egorkeen
    egorkeen 4 months ago +2

    You forgot to say that adjectives also can be changed in 6 cases + 3 genders, and plural xD

  • RomaxSinergy
    RomaxSinergy 5 months ago

    *The best tip of grasping the function of Ь and Ъ for learners of russian language.*
    It's extremely simple ! Just apply these two rules:
    - The *Ь* works like very-very short sound "и".
    - The *Ъ* works like very-very short sound "ы".

    • MiMi Lord
      MiMi Lord Month ago

      @Sasha S It's not exactly the truth, "Ь" could have an only role of dividing sign too, like "вьюга". Even without "Ь" "В' " will sounds soft because of next "Ю".

    • Sasha S
      Sasha S Month ago

      No. The first is "a soft sign", which makes the previous letter sound softer. The second one is sort of a dividing sign. They have nothing in common with any vowel in Russian.

  • Kaela Creighton
    Kaela Creighton 6 months ago

    During Obama's reign, they damaged my language part in my brain. I can't learn any new language and have a small vocabulary. Good thing it was above average and now I'm average in language, 30 points. I feel bad for everyone who had that done. Bobo the schizophrenic hobo who he hid. What scares you? I'm thankful I speak English, or the peasant language; I'd be doomed otherwise.

  • Scott
    Scott 7 months ago +3

    I gave up hard trying to learn Russian. I felt that Japanese was actually much easier.

    • We Good
      We Good 5 months ago

      I think learning Korean was easier than Russian

  • Reverse Batman
    Reverse Batman 7 months ago

    people who learn Russian, answer me please, I'm doing science project about difficulties of English-speakers in learning Russian, help me, I need practical part, write me as much as you can about your problems

  • Ydjin
    Ydjin 8 months ago +1

    And these are my dear friends, the modern Russian language, it is very simplified. The old Russian language is much more complicated and smarter. 😈
    Did you know that the ancient Russian language is very similar to the ancient Indian (Sanskrit)? How is that possible if there was no connection between the continents in those days?)

    • T. Janssen
      T. Janssen 7 months ago

      In the days of the Slavic proto-language and Sanskrit the Indian continent absolutely did connect to Eurasia :') Plate tectonics are very slow, and Indo-European hasn't been around for that long, on the scale of geological time. Heck, those continents were already in place when the first apes began to walk upright.

  • jurisprudens
    jurisprudens 8 months ago

    To all the foreigners who are scared of Russian cases. If you need to learn Russian quickly, not for formal use, but just to be able to communicate simply, you can save yourself some time and drop the cases. If you speak in the nominative case all the time, it sounds funny, but the Russians will still perfectly understand you, most of the time. So, don't worry about using a wrong case form - they are just an embellishment!

    • John Smith
      John Smith 7 months ago +2

      It's only practical for quick trip to Russia/CIS country, but not advisable to any serious learners, because wrong casing can stuck with you and unlearning something is 10 times more difficult than to learn it in the first place.

  • Hyper X3M
    Hyper X3M 8 months ago

    Russian is not easy, but it's even harder to not get mesmerized by your gorgeous eyes. There, I said it.

  • LionRS2014
    LionRS2014 8 months ago

    I think that when you hear and get used to it all of the sounds and the way the language works it doesn't feel as hard anymore.

  • Adam Mada
    Adam Mada 8 months ago +5

    what a pleasantly expressive face you have.

  • Michael Mccauslin
    Michael Mccauslin 8 months ago +6

    Russian still isn’t as hard as learning all the lgbt pronouns.

  • Михаил Маринченко

    Хорошее произношение

  • Анна Цокол
    Анна Цокол 9 months ago +13

    Лойс, если ты Russian))

  • Lone Rabbit
    Lone Rabbit 9 months ago

    It has been 4 months since I started learning Russian; for the first 2 months, I found it easy to pronounce and to learn its grammer becacase they are close to my mother tongue: Japanese. I realiezed, however, that it is WAY difficult to memorize the grammatical systems !!

  • valkonrad
    valkonrad 10 months ago

    Точно!

  • CuzaAliño
    CuzaAliño 10 months ago +1

    No matter how difficult it is someday I will speak rrrrRussian fluently and these things will never dissuade me.

  • Софья Моисеева
    Софья Моисеева 10 months ago +12

    Your eyes are sooooo beautiful😍💖💖💖

  • Sarah Криванкова
    Sarah Криванкова 11 months ago +3

    Just move to Schchelovo live there and speak no English for a year. You'll get the verbs of motion down

  • stephen hoy
    stephen hoy Year ago +1

    Thank you! I now realise I am not the only person who is struggling with this beautiful, incredible, amazing language !

  • Hh Gg
    Hh Gg Year ago

    Я русский iam russian

  • ruslan smirnov
    ruslan smirnov Year ago +6

    Pronouncing a soft (apostrophe) modifier (ь) is same unnatural for English as biting your own tongue while saying 'th' for Russians.

  • d da
    d da Year ago

    Holy fuck she's beautiful, how am I supposed to concentrate on the video?

  • Xana
    Xana Year ago +2

    Speaking about Russian "ы". You actually have it in English as well! Cos an "i" sounds perfectly like "ы" in words like "list", "ship", "live" and so on. Don't you agree?

    • Gennadiy M
      Gennadiy M 6 months ago

      Its kinda similar, but no, its a different sound. (Fluent speaker of both languages)

    • Xana
      Xana Year ago

      )))))) As you say

    • Xana
      Xana Year ago

      I hear what I hear where I live at the moment

  • Xana
    Xana Year ago +4

    It was very interesting for me as a native Russian to know a view of an English speaking person about my language. So - thank you very much! And you were very right and precise! Though it's always true about any language if it's not your native one. For us Russians English is difficult, especially tenses of verbs! I'm quite good at English but still can't figure out a difference between Past simple and Present perfect. Drives me crazy!

    • Xana
      Xana Year ago +1

      Sorry I didn' pay attention

    • Xana
      Xana Year ago +1

      Past Continuous and Present Continuous are the easiest ones. I'm OK with all tenses except with Past simple and Present Perfect. And all listed in the video difficulties of Russian are OK for me as a native speaker : ))

  • fevgg
    fevgg Year ago +1

    #1 - oh yeah! I hated them in school. The best think for you, you don't learn gamma rules. My son (we live in Canada) brought 10 words from school every day, leaned them, wrote text next day and that's it. He can speak and read English like native does.
    #2 - verbs. Вчера я читал книгу - Yesterday I read book. Вчера я прочитал книгу - Yesterday I have read book. The same. You just call that verbs different names.
    #3 - I would argue... Example I was, I use to be, I've been to etc
    #4 - Totally agree, for non-native Russian it's hard. But for me prepositions in English pains my ass... still. And you just gave analog Russian Prefixes to English Prepositions
    #5 - That's true, like for me is breaking my tongue trying to pronounce "th"
    #6 - You're brave. Так держать!

  • Lutch Bizin
    Lutch Bizin Year ago +4

    Thank you for your video, Bridget. There're two even more complex features than the 5 ones you've mentioned. First, verbal conjugation and second, in my opinion the hardest one - the stress of nouns in both their singular and plural forms. There are, basically speaking, 6 paradigms and heaps of exceptions.

  • Gm AproH
    Gm AproH Year ago +1

    Да знаю эту девушку) Симпатичная)

  • Mikhail Trokhinin
    Mikhail Trokhinin Year ago +1

    Занятно)))) Никогда не задумывался над такими нюансами. Спасибо)))

    • fevgg
      fevgg Year ago

      английские глаголы тоже очень трудные. То, как нас учили в России никак не доходило до меня, пока моя коллега по работе не объяснила мне аналогии с русскими. У нас вообще способ преподавания иностранного языка ужасный

  • Ras Putin
    Ras Putin Year ago +1

    Thank you

  • Ulf Danielsson
    Ulf Danielsson Year ago

    Thanks for explaining this Barbara )) You are so true.

  • Rita
    Rita Year ago +9

    I'm Russian) Thank you for the video, I'm proud of our language 😂 You speak Russian well! Good luck) So why do you learn Russian?

    • Manco Flamenco
      Manco Flamenco 9 months ago

      @Lutch Bizin it's easy. Since English doesn't have the same structure as Russian does some words can be confused in a sentence. Example:
      English:
      Verb: To book
      Noun: A book
      Adjective: Book
      Russian:
      Verb: бронировать
      Noun: книга
      Adjective: книжный
      E.g. A funny sentence:
      A book books a book book
      Книга бронирует книжную книгу

    • Lutch Bizin
      Lutch Bizin Year ago +2

      Toran, you're a nice, interesting chap. Well, you don't have to tell me about the complexities of the Russian language. I began to learn Russian in Brazil when I was 12 on my own next to English and German. English and German are a piece of cake when compared to Russian. Yes, if I had had the chance of talking to someone like you back then, I would have certainly given up on Russian. As I hadn't, I decided to take the bull by the horns and master all the Russian noun endings (значит, зубрить свои окончания!!!) including the Russian stress patterns - all on my own. Russian verbs were not that hard for me as Portuguese verbs (my native language is Portuguese) are also very hard. Those days, back in the 70s, I didn't have any Russian speaker I could talk to, so imagine how crazy my loneliness was: very busy loneliness. Did it pay off? To tell you the truth I don't know. We'll, I've become a patient person. I guess we repeat patterns Today I'm teaching myself Mandarin and its classical writing. And I tell you, nothing compares to the beauty and difficulty of studying the Chinese writing... I wish Bridget the best piece of luck on her Russian journey. And thank you for sharing your insights. They're great and I'll get back to you.

    • Lutch Bizin
      Lutch Bizin Year ago

      Thank you kindly for your insights, Toran. What's your first language?

    • Lutch Bizin
      Lutch Bizin Year ago

      True. Perhaps articles are not that essential, yet knowing how to use them can be daunting for speakers of languages like Russian. By the way, I love Russian. However, stressing nouns in their different cases is a hard job. Take for instance the noun волк. Sing. 'волка, 'волку, 'волком, 'волке. The plural nominative is 'волки. Then the stress falls on the last syllable of the other plural cases. So you get волк'ов, волк'ам, вол'ках, волк'ами. However, the family name is not Волк'ов like the noun. It's В'олков. Unfortunately, there are so many cases like this. Learning Russian is a daunting and rewarding experience!

  • jonn mace
    jonn mace Year ago +13

    This is intimidating. I'm interested in learning the Russian language but it really does seem like a nightmare to master the intricacies for a non-native speaker.

    • nihilismful
      nihilismful 8 months ago

      It's difficult...At First. But once you learn some of the fundamental rules of the language (especially grammar stuff like cases and the verbs), it provides a foundation that lets you relatively quickly learn the other stuff.

    • rosako
      rosako Year ago

      Toran, yes we will hit a wall at full speed if you want... If they are as smart as you are, you the guy who needed 24 a week non stop for two years to master English.... LOL..
      Funny enough, I live in a non-Russian speaking country, started learning Russian less than two years ago, I've never spent more than 3 hours per week learning, I actually do 30 minutes every single day with a remote teacher + speaking to myself describing what I'm doing through the day (quality versus quantity, right?). Ok, I won't say I fully master the language yet, but enough I join my Russian colleagues in their Skype calls without asking them to switch to English and almost never use English while on business trip in Russia, ... I guess I must have hit the wall without noticing LOL.
      I understand you fell bad, I also feel bad for you for wasting so many hours while you could have learned quicker if only you were half as smart as most of the people on this planet LOL :)

    • Xana
      Xana Year ago +1

      Just do it! Some things sound more complicated when you describe it. Could you imagine to describe your every action when you walk? It would sound crazy difficult, wouldn't it? But we just walk easily and automatically : ))

    • rosako
      rosako Year ago

      Scumbag? Wow thanks lol. Well.. Now I got it.. You are this kind of people.. Because YOU believe something is pointless, you think everyone has to agree with you.
      TWO YEARS STUDYING 12 HOURS A WEEK + 12 HOURS OF HOMEWORK??? I hope you are not trying to give advice to anyone in learning languages........... LOL . "above all expectations", are we supposed to applause because you spent 24 hours a week during 2 years in order to be fluent in English? ................ RI-DI-CU-LOUS .............
      You are just a frustrated clown. You spent a lot of time studying a single foreign language and still probably pissed off because you still don't master it. You can't stand seeing people getting fluent in your own language while you're struggling like hell trying to speak English lol. The reality is that you turn into a hater when you see people like her in the video who managed to reach a very decent level of Russian, while she's living in the US..
      Anyway, not everyone wants to fully master a foreign language. Some people simply want to be able to understand what's going on. Or if you go to Russia very frequently for work purpose or simple tourism, it's a good move to learn some basics, because when you're even in Moscow you can face a situation where the person in front of you at the bar, restaurant or whatever does not speak English. Or even just to be able to read street and metro station names, etc..
      "Getting back to the initial question of whether it is worth to study Russian gives a simple answer of NO!"
      -> That's your opinion. And anyway you are clearly never going to learn any additional language, so why do you even bother yourself watching such videos on TVclip? :)
      Stay with your philosophy, avoid all sort of challenge in life, that's good for you. Good luck :)

  • Doom
    Doom Year ago +12

    I dont want to learn Russian any more. lol D:

  • Eduard Savostyanov
    Eduard Savostyanov Year ago +4

    Hi Barbara ! nice to see you here

  • Buddha's Disciple
    Buddha's Disciple Year ago +1

    Insightful ! Please tell us, how can a non-native speaker become fluent in Russian (C1/C2 level)?

  • Андрей Желтяк

    Think about "ь" as short "е", and "ъ" as short "о" or "ы" (which is historically a digraph "ъ+i"). Voila, mystery solved.

  • D Davis
    D Davis Year ago +5

    just use duolingo.. that's what I use.

    • rosako
      rosako Year ago +1

      D Davis yea that’s the app I started with. I agree it’s absolutely awesome!

  • kip 4
    kip 4 Year ago

    Научи меня английскому

    • kip 4
      kip 4 Year ago

      Toran Krivein Занимайся со мной

    • Миодраг Здравковић
      Миодраг Здравковић Year ago

      kip 4 Зачем вам это нужно? я знаю английский, но в конце я застрял в изучении русского языка, потому что он очень похож на сербский!

  • CRASH
    CRASH Year ago +25

    Respect for Barbara!

  • Pavel Voronin
    Pavel Voronin Year ago +2

    ой, забавно) Бриджит - прикольный ролик) подписан на её канал и инсту))

  • Денис Трунин

    Прекрасный язык. Я от него теку.)0)

    • CRASH
      CRASH Year ago +1

      Лисёнок Маэстра увожаю:)

    • Денис Трунин
      Денис Трунин Year ago +2

      CRASH THEPARTY "великий и могучий ".

    • CRASH
      CRASH Year ago +2

      Лисёнок Маэстра Английский или русский? ;) хых

  • Денис Семёнов

    WOW, Bridget here? Surprise.

  • RUSSIA BEYOND
    RUSSIA BEYOND  Year ago

    Bridget's TVclip channel - tvclip.biz/channel/UCqILnGzWyjqnPFqS2e1yVWQ