Super Strength For The Future You? | Future You | NPR

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  • Published on May 14, 2019
  • Will mind-controlled robot suits help end some disabilities as we know them … and lead the way to super strength? In this episode of NPR’s series, Future You with Elise Hu, the team goes to the University of Houston to try out a mind-controlled exoskeleton. Research on using brain signals to operate machines has made quick advancements in recent years, and this is a demo of a future in which brain-computer interfaces can help those with spinal cord injuries get on their feet, by simply thinking about walking.
    • Read "How Mind-Controlled Robot Suits Could Enhance Our Limbs" at n.pr/2H7NVEA
    • Read : "How Computer-Assisted Telepathy Helps Humans Communicate" at n.pr/2vQ2EP6
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  • Science & TechnologyScience & Technology

Comments • 40

  • Jdlc
    Jdlc 3 months ago

    I wish they insteas focused on fixing paralysed bodies instead of building exoskeletons

  • Mohan Krishnan
    Mohan Krishnan 4 months ago

    Elise Hu ... that is a terrific piece!!

  • John Billings
    John Billings 5 months ago

    Mind controlled robots? And Yet... they can't make filters that work for water?
    www.npr.org/2019/08/13/750806632/newarks-drinking-water-problem-lead-and-unreliable-filters
    Maybe a tecky can explain what the problem is?
    The future seems like the SOS.

  • jayknight139
    jayknight139 7 months ago

    I'd be pretty pissed about that name if I couldn't walk.

  • GS_01-03
    GS_01-03 7 months ago

    Can’t wait for the day that kids like him will be able to walk around like anyone else. Cybernetics can’t advance soon enough.

  • NVG 2022
    NVG 2022 7 months ago

    I love this series 😍

  • Benjamin Bangsberg
    Benjamin Bangsberg 8 months ago

    I like that the brian operated hand was used for chocolating. Though that seems like if they want to test sensitivity they should have something like a pen and income taxes.... though that could get you in front of an ethics panel.....

  • Brod
    Brod 8 months ago

    So Mjolnir from Halo?

  • John Appleseed
    John Appleseed 8 months ago

    1:52 "yes ma'am"
    🤔
    REALLY? "yes ma'am"?
    ......
    Something feels wrong.

  • Zachary A. Edminster
    Zachary A. Edminster 8 months ago

    I hope that Savion gets his robot legs.

  • Camilo Rojo
    Camilo Rojo 8 months ago

    Cool

  • king.yugeen real nigga
    king.yugeen real nigga 8 months ago

    Thats fucked up name your son after a tap dancer😂💀

  • Matt Belis
    Matt Belis 8 months ago

    The quality of this video was outstanding, visual effects and clearness of audio. In my perspective, a script was not perfectly developt it was nice to have a potential patient but it wasn't in cohesion with the rest of the content. The script was also delivered with nice, understandable and enthusiastic narration
    Thank you for this series I enjoy this ep

  • EskmM
    EskmM 8 months ago +3

    how long untill we have cyborgs with elbow swords

  • Johny Marcial
    Johny Marcial 8 months ago +4

    So basically in the future, there will be a Psycho-framed Gundam.

  • Josh willis
    Josh willis 8 months ago +1

    It's super fucked up that kid wasn't able to try the legs :(

  • Greg Hartwick
    Greg Hartwick 8 months ago +10

    What are the chances of settling up a GoFundMe for Savion “to dance”? I don’t know how to do that but I would gladly kick-in some money.

  • John Syzlack
    John Syzlack 8 months ago +2

    I think Elise Hue (sorry if I'm spelling it wrong) is doing a great job of promoting NPR on TVclip. But it's disingenuous. NPR'S member stations (at least here in New York) is little more than hating on conservatives like me.
    You guys want to project this image you're showing in this video, that's great. But I wish NPR would metaphorically bash a few heads at WAMC and WNYC and demand a bit of ideological fairness from them.

    • Tea Rex
      Tea Rex 8 months ago +3

      @John Syzlack Yea their effect is they hurt china's economy like they hurt the US's

    • John Syzlack
      John Syzlack 8 months ago

      @The Unit Operator TL, DR, I think they should look at them!

    • John Syzlack
      John Syzlack 8 months ago

      @The Unit Operator Well, you said a lot of things in what I see as a rant, but I'll respond to your question if that's alright.
      Conservative TVcliprs pay attention to the comments that show up on their page and they do so with some emotion.
      The reason they do, aside from the obvious monetary benefit that likes and views (and the ad revenue that those things bring) give them is that their desire is to connect with the people who watch their videos.
      My hope (and it's probably a fool's errand) is that NPR will remember the original purpose they were created for and put the 'public' back into National Public Radio.
      Show all sides of the argument. Be objective. Inform, entertain, and let the public form opinions.
      I'm hoping that they pay attention to things that we say in response to their videos.

    • The Unit Operator
      The Unit Operator 8 months ago

      John Syzlack I can concede to your point of not having a proper representation of the other viewpoint. With that said though why comment on a video that NPR representatives won’t even look at? You know besides wanting to get into arguments with people like me? Because in my honest opinion I believe that’s what you’re doing here. Because generally people do understand that contacting the company DIRECTLY does more for change or at least gives you more answers. I mean clearly you have an issue with the program you’re listening to so why not write them an email instead of getting into pointless arguments with some random stranger on the internet because you find their viewpoints disagreeable. I’ve seen you write a comment on every video from NPR. What’s the point? That on the off chance that they do somehow look at the comments that they’ll see yours and pass the word along? I don’t see that happening and I’m guessing neither do you. So go write an email about your issues and don’t comment on here in the vein hope that you’ll somehow implement change through a stupid TVclip comment.

  • Chill with Coffee
    Chill with Coffee 8 months ago +2

    Let technology enable people to work and not take away work from people. This is so amazing 🙂

    • Matt Sven
      Matt Sven 8 months ago

      Catch-22 - inevitably this will take away work from people, as the strength and speed they provide might mean that you need less people to perform a task. As we move into a highly automated, technologically advanced society it's going to become imperative that there are ways for us to support ourselves and find meaning outside of work/capitalist systems.

  • Tim Bartsch
    Tim Bartsch 8 months ago +2

    Cool video NPR