How to break a wine glass with sound

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  • Published on Mar 17, 2008
  • This is for a physics project. Here's a little more detail on the steps:

    Step 1: the program we used took the audio sample and used a Fourier Transform to convert it into a graph of the frequencies up to ~11,000 Hz, and their relative magnitude. The glass used in step 1 broke around 630.4 Hz, but the footage was bad so for step 3 a different glass was used, that had a resonance frequency of around 592 Hz.

    Step 2: if you're around (+/- .5 Hz) the resonance frequency of the glass and if the amplitude of the sound (AKA volume) is loud enough (we used earplugs), you'll see the rim of the glass waving like that.

    Step 3: we basically repeated step 2, except with a higher amplitude of the sound.

    I should also mention that the bright light you see in the video is a strobe light, going at about 590-600 flashes per second (4 Hz higher than the sound), each flash lasts 10 microseconds. You can't see the movement of the glass without some sort of strobe light or way of slowing down the movement, because the glass was oscillating nearly 600 times per second. If you have any questions feel free to post them and I'll answer.
  • Science & TechnologyScience & Technology

Comments • 39

  • Yahia Rizk
    Yahia Rizk 8 months ago

    What's the name of the program????

  • bageli tsandila
    bageli tsandila Year ago

    can i do this eith smartphone speaker?

  • POtterAAngERagon
    POtterAAngERagon 2 years ago +1

    That is amazing! *Great job*

  • KeterLordFR
    KeterLordFR 2 years ago +2

    A friend of mine tried something like this : he turned the frequency a little bit higher than the glass', like 3-4 Hz or so, and the glass literally turned into dust.

    • Helen Jay
      Helen Jay 6 months ago

      KeterLordFR WOW, I think you would need to match the sound that the glass projects, I have watched MythBusters or something and the result was it was something like E flat note.

  • george serkedakhs
    george serkedakhs 3 years ago

    *nice*

  • Itzz Hexx
    Itzz Hexx 4 years ago

    *lol*

  • Ryan Pippin
    Ryan Pippin 4 years ago

    If only you had a high speed HD camera...

  • Amy James
    Amy James 4 years ago

    1420.41 mhz

  • Jarod Billingslea
    Jarod Billingslea 4 years ago

    wtf you can make bold text with asterisks now lol *XD*

  • Jarod Billingslea
    Jarod Billingslea 4 years ago

    "I CAN'T TAKE THIS SHIT NO MORE!!" *SSPPPSHHEERRRUUU*

  • Siddesh Gannu
    Siddesh Gannu 5 years ago

    What did you use to make the glass resonate?

  • MixMix1203
    MixMix1203 6 years ago

    The straw was like
    'GET ME OUTTA HERE!!!!!'

  • Dustin Kellerman
    Dustin Kellerman 6 years ago

    1:33 look right under the straw.... Am I the only one who sees a creepy face????

  • theaarontjuh
    theaarontjuh 6 years ago

    le bat...

  • WatchJojo.com
    WatchJojo.com 6 years ago

    lol 1:17

  • Sans the Skeleton
    Sans the Skeleton 6 years ago

    @toonsliverspider A baseball bat could work.

  • Sans the Skeleton
    Sans the Skeleton 6 years ago

    Awesome dancing straw! :D

  • Isabella Martinez
    Isabella Martinez 7 years ago

    HOW LOUD DID YOU HAVE TO PLAY THE FREQUENCY FOR IT TO BREAK? (decibels please. Oh and sorry for screaming at you, but i got your attention!)

  • iToucheverything
    iToucheverything 7 years ago

    It's an E-Flat!! Yay for perfect pitch!! :D Lol. But the glass broke when they played a D...

  • AlexBlackRecords
    AlexBlackRecords 7 years ago

    @BrandonShayMusic Good questions. I wonder also the weight or density of the crystal must be a very imporatant variable. I wonder if it's generally true as it seems the more glass/ crystal weight and size the lower the pitch and resonance will be. Large crystal bowls have a deep low note and a small glass a high note.

  • AlexBlackRecords
    AlexBlackRecords 7 years ago

    Thats some cool software and synthesizer. I'm sure I could do it iwh my synth too but finding the frequency maybe tricky. I think I could get close enough by ear and then fine tune it, it has several oscillators, and my amps should be more than loud enough. It might be more cool to see if I can do it my guitar. Is there enough sustain? I'm not sure the the guitar has the right range I think it's a bit lower than this even at it's high notes.

  • lordshen3
    lordshen3 7 years ago

    ................ i am a kid so i don know can you tell us if there anything a kid can have that can break glass?

  • Brandon Dardano
    Brandon Dardano 7 years ago

    also its Brandon that made that comment... Jermazoid is my friend he was on my computer earlier and i didn't realize i was logged in as him. Sorry for the confusion

  • Brandon Dardano
    Brandon Dardano 7 years ago

    I wonder if there is mathematically quantifiable correlation between the volume of the glass, it's thickness, and it's shape as three separate variables that determine invariably the resonating frequency! so like (VTS-->Hz) From what I know, sound is generally logarithmic in nature, so perhaps logarithms would be in the equation as well as trigometric functions. Atmospheric pressure could affect the frequency as well, but I doubt it would be significant. Hopefully this provokes some thought...

  • Jeremy Flechsig
    Jeremy Flechsig 7 years ago

    I wonder if there is mathematically quantifiable correlation between the volume of the glass, it's thickness, and it's shape as three separate variables that determine invariably the resonating frequency! so like (VTS-->Hz) From what I know, sound is generally logarithmic in nature, so perhaps logarithms would be in the equation as well as trigometric functions (you know, since any sound wave can be reduced to pure sins and cosines... Idk hopefully this provokes some thought...

  • Trisscarr
    Trisscarr 8 years ago

    straw was raving.

  • blahdob
    blahdob 8 years ago

    thank god i have an oscilloscope

  • Amando Abreu
    Amando Abreu 8 years ago

    i suggest using a steel rod instead of a pen :P

  • Daniel Foster
    Daniel Foster 8 years ago

    What kind of tone generator did you use to break the glass.

  • Kevin Miller
    Kevin Miller 9 years ago

    You guys need to take this knowledge and use it towards a hydrogen fuel cell. This is how the water is fractured to create the good HHO!! Good luck and thanks.

  • Daniel Liggett
    Daniel Liggett  10 years ago

    I don't know what the exact amplitude was; the program I used didn't measure that correctly. The straw bouncing around means that you're very close to the resonant frequency, but not necessarily exact. I suggest you try doing a range of frequencies, started at about 5 hz below your current frequency, to 5 hz above it. I suggest you wear earplugs, then turn up the volume to the point where anyone not wearing earplugs would plug their ears. I believe around 90 decibels should work.

  • Daniel Liggett
    Daniel Liggett  10 years ago

    Every class has a different resonance frequency, the glasses that I used varied between 590 and 640 Hz. However, another glass we tried broke at around 1000 Hz.

  • Daniel Liggett
    Daniel Liggett  10 years ago

    I already said, I used MatLab. The code was written just for this project, so I doubt easily it's available. The important part of the program was doing a Fourier Transform on the recorded audio. You just need a program to do that. I don't know of any that easily do it, though.

  • radwanwwwwww
    radwanwwwwww 10 years ago

    pleasssseeee ??????? :(

  • radwanwwwwww
    radwanwwwwww 10 years ago

    pleas give me the name :P

  • Daniel Liggett
    Daniel Liggett  10 years ago

    It's not something that's easily available, it's a script written by my dad in MatLab, which is a $3000 program.

  • radwanwwwwww
    radwanwwwwww 10 years ago

    what program are you using (to measure the frecuency)? :P